Anne Barwell – Juggling Apples & Oranges

When I mention I’m in the middle of edits—again!—and planning posts for blogging and cover reveals, the usual response from people who aren’t writers is: ‘oh, I didn’t realise there was that much work involved.’

A friend once told me that once your book is accepted by a publisher, then the work really begins. She was so right.

At present I’m juggling a bit more than just apples (edits) and oranges (promo). I’m also on a deadline to finish a book I need to submit at the beginning of June. Given I have a novella—Sunset at Pencarrow co-written with Lou Sylvre—releasing on 7th June, and a novel—Comes a Horseman—being published on 1st August, life is a little hetic right now.

Photo from Max Pixel – freegreatpicture.com

I also have another book under contract, and was very relieved when I discovered its planned publication date wasn’t until October/November this year. Phew. At least I can relax for maybe a month before the edits show up for that one. No wait, I have a tax return due 1st July, and a very long ‘to write list’. I need to play catch up on book reviews too, as I have a growing pile of books I’ve read and written copious notes about but haven’t had time to type up a review.

So anyway, I figured a good subject for this post would be to write about my experiences with the publishing process. Please note that others might have different experiences, and their publishers might do things differently. One thing I’ve found is that with each new book the process changes slightly as the publisher refines the way it does things—which is rather cool actually.

The first step is writing the book, and I often find I take annual leave at this point, especially when I have a submission deadline because something always happens to impact my writing time. Next comes the submission, and the waiting to find out whether the publisher wants the book.

Once the contract is signed, a different kind of work begins. By now I’m expecting the forms I’ll need to fill in fairly early on in the process, so I have all the information on hand and ready to go. This includes author’s notes, front matter, dedication, and, if it’s an historical, a list of resources used. The first time I had to provide the latter my reaction was “eep”. I work in a library so my list of resources is often the size of a novella just on its own. Now, if I’m writing an historical I make notes of every resource I use as I go which makes life a lot easier. I also think about what I’d like for cover art, as this question comes very early on in the process too, and with this in mind I have a handy guide to my characters written out so I’m not wading through a word document to find it. The blurb I’ve already written as I need to send it in with the submission, although I know my early version will probably not be the one on the back of the book.

Next come edits. These usually turn up several months before the release date, which won’t be definite until much closer to the time. Usually the contract states a window of a couple of months for the projected release date EG August/September. There is never just one lot of edits, as it’s a good idea to get more than one editor to take a look at the manuscript, as different people spot different things. Structural edits are followed by copy edits, which are followed by PR prep edits, which lead into the galley. The first two of these often have more than one round, and if you’re writing something historical and/or including phrases or words in another language there’s the historical and foreign language edits as well.

With Sunset at Pencarrow and Comes a Horseman out months apart I’d send back edits for one book, go to make a cup of tea, and find edits for the other book in my inbox.

And yes… I’m still trying to write my book which has a submission deadline a week before I have a book due out.

Photo from Max Pixel – freegreatpicture.com

So I’m now organising promo, as well as expecting galleys for two books, writing my two scheduled monthly blog posts, and oh yeah… real life, what’s that again? Housework and gardening at this point are just loud sighs of knowing I’ll need to play catch up or….do them as my breaks away from the computer on writing days. It’s not good to work 24/7 either which is why I keep up with the things I do to unwind—movie nights with friends, and playing in an orchestra.

I have a slight breathing space before having to write blog posts for all the stops on the tours for the new books, so hoping to spend that time writing. That is, if nothing else turns up in the meantime.

Wish me luck and catch you on the flip side.

5 thoughts on “Anne Barwell – Juggling Apples & Oranges”

  1. Wow! Good luck with all your edits, writing, promo and that pesky daily life stuff. Thanks for sharing the process. I didn’t realize there were so many different rounds of edits. With more than one book going, it must be tough to keep things from getting confused.

    1. Thanks, Jen. Daily life stuff can be pesky when you’re trying to get everything else done. I write in more than one genre too – so it can be interesting switching from an New Zealand set contemporary romance to France in 1944 for something more action/drama.

      1. I always enjoy learning more about how other writers work. I didn’t realise that this extended to the process after the publisher accepts the manuscript too! Most of it is the same as my own experiences, but I’d never have thought to keep track of resources used for a historical. Fascinating–and yes, good luck, Anne!

        1. Thanks, Gillian. I hadn’t thought about keeping track of resources until I ran into first time round. Now, with my fourth historical coming out, I guess I have experience on my side. Forgot to mention other fun stuff after the book is published like the legal deposit to National Library…

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