There And Back Again – Anne Barwell

As I’m knee deep in writing blog posts for the upcoming release of Sunset at Pencarrow with my partner in crime, Lou Sylvre, I figured I’d blog about blog tours. I’ve been asked by non-writers what they entail so here goes…

The title of this post is from The Hobbit by J.R.R Tolkien, and as our upcoming book is set in New Zealand, it seemed appropriate.

Disclaimer: Everyone’s experiences and modus operandi is different, and I’d love to hear from you guys about what you’ve done. Also—readers—how do you find new books and do you follow blog tours?

Many authors use blog tour companies to set up their tours for them, and they do a fabulous job finding blog stops and helping to get exposure for a book. However, as I’ve only hosted for those, rather than used them for promotion, I’m going to blog about how I’ve set about promoting my books, and what’s involved.

Graphic from Michal Klajban (Hikingisgood.com)

The first thing I do is set up a cover reveal when the book goes up for pre-order so I have buy links. This is usually about a month before the book’s release.

The next thing is finding tour stops. My publisher is fantastic with this, and organises stops at review sites etc for me, so I just need to build on that. I usually aim for about twelve stops all up, and approach other authors for space on their blog. They’re always very supportive, and I love the way our author community is always ready to help each other out.

I then find about three excerpts to use on the tour. For some books it’s difficult finding excerpts that leave the reader wanting more, but don’t give away too much of the plot. I have a word doc I update with each book that has all the promo details I need – blurb, buy links, my social media links, and the excerpts. I’ll throw other handy info/links etc into the doc along the way. That way when I send my posts to each site, I just need to write my blog post, and then copy/paste all the other info from my promo doc, and attach the book cover, and any other graphics I want to send.

Offering a chance to win—often an ebook from a backlist—can also be a part of the tour. As a reader, I’ve found several new authors I now love that way.

The most time consuming part of a blog tour is writing the posts that go with it. Twelve stops mean a lot of topics to find to write 500 or so words about. Luckily some stops provide a handy list of topics, and/or a list of interview questions. I love interview questions, especially as some of them really make me think, and it’s one less topic I need to find. I also choose one excerpt that will only go up on a particular site so it’s exclusive to them.

Usually I let the book dictate the topics. I love reading about other authors and how their writing process works, and their behind the scenes peek at their books, so I figure I’ll write what I want to read. For example, with an historical I’ll do at least one blog post about research. Music often plays a part in my stories, so I’ll write about my writing ‘soundtrack’, or how a character being a musician drove the plot. As I write different genres, that tends to play a part in blog post topics too.

It can be a challenge finding something different to focus on for each stop, and I find I usually need to put aside at least two weeks with each book to work on promo. After all, readers aren’t going to read a book if they don’t know it’s out there.

Don’t forget we’re running a rafflecopter giveaway here at Authors Speak for May. Click on the link to find out more, and don’t forget to enter!

What’s in a Name

Recently, out of nowhere, I was contacted by an author explaining she was setting up a blog tour for her very first release. In her email she mentioned the names of a few people and it seemed she was using them for references and I was supposed to know who they were. I didn’t, however, I knew right away what was going on.

See, there is another Elizabeth Noble and she writes het romance. I believe she lives in England and is about ten years younger than I am.

I said, yes, of course I had blog space for another author and her debut novel. The book sounded really interesting, too. I wrote back, saying I wanted to be sure she didn’t have me confused with the other author. I gave her the link to my website and went on to say how wonderful it would be to have her as a guest. Lots of people read both MM and Het romance, something I pointed out. Maybe she’d find some new readers. Maybe I would. I looked forward to working with her.

I never heard back from her. Very sad.

I don’t know anything about the other Elizabeth Noble except what’s listed in her bio. I have no idea if that’s her real name or a pen name.

The name I go by, Elizabeth Noble, is sort of my pen name, but it’s also my real name. I’m not sure how others go about deciding on a pen name, but I didn’t have to look far for mine.

I was born Laura Elizabeth Noble. My surname has twice changed for different reasons, but the Laura and the Elizabeth have remained the same.

So, see, really Elizabeth Noble is my actual name. I chose to use that variation for a few reasons. I always liked my middle name and when I was little I tried to get people to call me Elizabeth, but it never took.

I opted to use Noble because that’s who I originally was, the real me so to speak. It’s also an easily remembered and spelled name. My legal surname is longer, sorta hard to spell and some people find it difficult to pronounce. It’s one of those names that spells and says exactly how it looks, but still trips people up.

My father’s name was Bernie Noble. At one time he was a bit famous and a photographer for The Cleveland Press newspaper.

I can’t take a decent photograph to save my life, or anyone else’s… go figure.

Bernie Noble, however, could take a decent photograph.

This picture sits on a shelf next to my desk. It’s a photo Bernie took that was later entered into a photography show and competition. He did a lot of that sort of thing. I like it because of the mouse sitting on the cat’s head. My father was a big cat lover.

Being the head photographer for The Cleveland Press for a few decades (and a professional photographer all his adult life) he took a lot of pictures.

One, however, was really special.

In 1963 Bernie took a photograph of US President Eisenhower which was later selected by his wife, Mamie for use with the stamp that was issued commemorating him. It was a six cent stamp!

Sitting in my attic is a copy of that photograph as well as one of my father holding the photograph. I have no idea who took that photo, I’m guessing one of his coworkers at the newspaper for a little article they did at the time.

           

So, that’s a little bit of history surrounding my pen name.

Don’t forget to enter our Merry May giveaway for a chance to win a Kindle Fire and books!

Until next time,

Happy Reading!

Elizabeth Noble

Writer’s Police Academy Part 2: K9 Units by Sarah Madison

I confess, when I saw the K9 handler pull up on that first afternoon at WPA, during the open Q&A session with various law enforcement and emergency personnel, I was immediately drawn to watch. Having owned many high-drive German Shepherds myself, I couldn’t help but admire the power and beauty of these dogs, as well as the appreciate some of the similarities between these working dogs and my own.

But it was impressed upon us just how different these dogs are from any family pet.

I’ll try to make sense from my hastily scribbled notes.

The K9 units are subdivided by specialty training: SWAT, patrol, drug work. A typical shift is 10 hours/ day (though the officers are paid for eleven hours, to include grooming and care of the dogs), four days on, four days off.

Unlike the other units, the drug units frequently rely on sporting dogs for drug work—Labradors, Pointers, etc. It makes sense, as many of these breeds have been selected for their sense of smell as well as a willingness to retrieve. Handlers are only allowed to stay with the drug unit for 5 years before moving into another division—presumably to help prevent burnout.

Most of the ‘police’ dogs are imported from Germany. Handlers undergo six weeks of intensive training, but it can take up to a year before the handler/dog team is call ready. Handlers are expected to train daily. The length of time spent training depends on both handler ability and the capability of the dog.

The cost of a single dog plus training runs between $12-13 thousand dollars—it’s a major investment for a police department. The K9 handler spent a good deal of time discussing protecting that investment, as there had recently been a local case of a dog dying in a police car due to overheating. The cars have fixed grills in them that allow the windows to be rolled down without the dog being able to leave the car. Newer police K9 units have heat sensors that will roll down the windows automatically if the car becomes too hot. Lights and sirens also go off, and a text is sent to the dispatch, the handler, and the captain. As a system of fail-safes, it should be foolproof, and yet many departments have older vehicles well-past retirement age due to budget cuts. All three management systems failed in the case of the heat-related dog death.

There are protection vests for the police dogs, but they are seldom used because they weight between 40-50 pounds, greatly hampering the dog’s ability to do its job. No officer will send their dog in on a ‘suicide mission’, but they will put the dog in danger to protect a fellow officer. Ultimately, the police dog is a tool, much as a service weapon. The speaker stated that the dogs weren’t considered part of the ‘use of force’ continuum, but unfortunately, didn’t explain that statement further.

The average working lifespan of a police dog is eight years, after which they are retired with the handler or euthanized. These dogs are NOT socialized. Walking on a leash in the neighborhood is not an option. The handler who spoke with us estimated his kennel arrangement at the house cost about three thousand dollars to make a safe, dog-proof environment. While euthanasia, if the handler is not prepared to retire the dog at his home, may sound cruel after a lifetime of service, it is preferable to the practice of auctioning off retiring dogs to the highest bidder, which some cash-strapped communities have done in the past. The liability of doing such a thing has probably ended this practice for the most part.

The handler and dog are a team—the dog is rarely out of the handler’s sight, and is the handler’s backup in any given situation. Handlers have a remote control which can open the rear door of the police car and release the dog. The handler can direct a search, direct an attack, but in an open brawl, the dog cannot distinguish friend from foe and will attack the most animated person. This is because the dogs are selected for having a strong prey drive, which means they go after anything that moves. I have personal experience with that, as my last shepherd had a strong prey drive. The very first time he laid eyes on a black bear, he chased it up the side of a mountain!

Dogs are usually trained to ‘bark and hold’, which means they will go up to a suspect and bark but not engage unless the suspect moves. If a dog is already lit up with excitement, however, training may break and the dog might engage regardless.

Dogs are frequently used as a locating tool. The handler referred to ‘walkaways’, which are people who are either suicidal, have dementia, or walked out of an assisted living situation. Dogs are used to locate people in buildings or parks, finding them much more efficiently than a human searcher could do.

Dogs are also frequently utilized at traffic stops because an officer can only hold a driver for so long without probable cause, but if a dog alerts on a car, they have probable cause.

The thing that the handler reiterated the most was that, though he would bawl his eyes out if anything happened to his dog, he was prepared to sacrifice his dog’s life to save a human being. The bond between handler and dog is great, but ultimately, the dog is there to be used.

Tune in next time, when I’ll treat you to the highlights of body armor and how it stops certain kinds of ammunition.

In the meantime, check out the reason I wanted to go to WPA in the first place, the FBI guys from the Sixth Sense series!

I’m also giving away a free short story for signing up for my newsletter.

Also, be sure to check out our Rafflecopter Giveaway for a Kindle Fire loaded with books from our gang here at Authors Speak!

A Bit on the Side…

Before anyone has pause for concern, this isn’t a post about extramarital affairs, but instead about my ever-expanding list of works in progress. And when certain stories keep butting in to try and derail my carefully mapped out (– ha!) writing plan.

What I am currently working on is a series of for books charting the history of the Redbourn family from my Crofton Chronicles series. Here I’m planning to write four novels, one for a different Earl of Crofton through different periods of British history (Early Stuart, Restoration, Regency, Victorian). As you can imagine, not only will these take a significant amount of time to write, there is also a lot of research to be done for each period.

So I’ve finished the first one and happy writing the second, when BOOM I get hit by a completely unrelated plot idea that won’t be quelled until I crack open a Word doc and write an extremely high-level plot outline for a paranormal rom com where an angel is planning to attend a general paranormal creature conference for continuing professional development, and the poor frazzled human conference planner who didn’t realise what he was signing up for.

Strange brain appeased, I return to the 17th century and highwaymen, only for a subplot with would be perfect for my ‘Very British’ sci fi story to barge in and I need to make sure it’s captured, and that a certain type of biscuit would be fit for purpose (yeah, don’t ask).

In reality, my brain is not one to stick to the same thing for long. When I write a contemporary it’s off pining for fantasy realms, if we are busy creating an enchanted forest then a desire to be in a historical setting with frock coats and periwigs crawls out of the woodwork… I really can’t keep my brain beast happy.

However, I think I have found a way to keep it sated. By having a bit on the side…

I’ve recently had a new mobile phone which comes with the MS Office suite, and using that and cloud storage I can write while out and about using my phone without having to whip out a notebook and type it up later. What I have now is the paranormal rom com and the historical trotting along together, and I’m surprised that instead of derailing my main writing project (the historical), it’s actually helping. Giving my brain a break from the past seems to be enough to super-charge it.

How do you handle writing? Multiple WIPs on the go? Or stories queued waiting for their chance?

Oh, and while you are here, don’t forget our giveaway to win a Kindle!

REBECCA COHEN is a Brit abroad. Having swapped the Thames for the Rhine, she has left London behind and now lives with her husband and young son in Basel, Switzerland. She can often be found with a pen in one hand and a cup of Darjeeling in the other.

Contacts:

Blog: http://rebeccacohenwrites.wordpress.com/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/rebecca.cohen.710

Twitter: http://twitter.com/R_Cohen_writes

The Authors Speak Merry May Giveaway (win a Kindle™ and a bunch of books)

Hello! Lou Sylvre, happy to be here for my monthly blog. In this post, I’m all about launching our biggest giveaway yet, and I’ll get to that in a flash. First though, I want to talk a little about Authors Speak, what we do, why we love having you be part of it, and opportunities for everyone—readers and writers—to be heard right here on this platform.

Authors Speak is designed to be a different kind of writers’ blog. Yes, we do talk about our books, our genre, writing tips, and the industry. Sometimes, we just have post something because it’s fun. But other times, we have something to say about the world in a broader sense. As authors, we live in the world like everyone else, and we respond to “big issues” like elections, laws, wars, poverty, corporate greed, and hate crimes. Our lives as humans isn’t separate from our lives as writers, and sometimes we blog here on Authors Speak about how it all ties in, and what we try to do about it. In other words, Authors Speak is a place for Authors to do just what our name says—speak our minds.

Of course, speaking out is pointless if nobody is listening, so thank you to everyone who’s visited the blog. And you know what? We realize readers sometimes want to speak out too, and you can! As you know, comments are welcome and appreciated, but here’s a new offer:

Authors Speak now has a Readers Say, page! Can’t find it? That’s because it’s blank. You might be our first reader guest. If you’re interested, comment below (which also counts as an entry for the giveaway drawing), or if you’d prefer, email me at lou.sylvre@gmail.com, and we’ll discuss particulars.

We’re know some who read our blog are fellow authors. If that’s you, we invite you onstage too! If you’d like a guest post in the spirit of Authors Speak, of if you have a cover reveal, new release, or other news announcement, please comment or email me. We’ll do our best to fit you in.

(Now for the really fun stuff)

Welcome to the Authors Speak Merry May Giveaway!
a Rafflecopter giveaway