Why I Write




Has it been a month already? Well I guess it has. Welcome back for another of my posts on Authors Speak.

Last month I rambled on a bit about why I write what I write. This month I’ve chosen a broader topic: Why I write.

I probably should have led with that, sorry.

So, let’s delve into what drives a person (me) to spend a part of everyday working on creating a story, the type of story doesn’t matter, it’s the act of writing that matters. There are a number of reasons people begin writing. Some write as a hobby or as a stress reliever. Therapists recommend writing as part of recovery for many people. It’s a way to get feelings out of your head. Once I read of a method that advocated writing down what’s bothering you on paper and then burn the paper to clear away negative emotions.

Others (me) begin as children, making up stories about the world around them. It’s a way of correcting something gone wrong or to further explore a favorite book or television show. I didn’t learn until decades later that’s called fanfiction—more on that next month.

The great thing about writing is you don’t have to be good at it, you simply have to do it. I write because it’s something I love doing. These days I write with the goal of publishing, but that wasn’t always my motivation. Having your work published isn’t what makes one a writer.

What makes someone a writer is the drive to write.


There are people who keep what they write private for a number of reasons. You know what? That’s okay. We’re not required to share every little detail about ourselves with the world. I kept much of what I wrote very private for a long time. During school, before college, I was the girl who walked around with a notebook hidden in with my other books. I wrote down all sorts of stories and tried out different styles. When I wasn’t reading books to escape into a little fantasy world I was writing them.

I love to read and eventually discovered a sure fire way to find exactly the types of stories I want to read was to write them. It’s a simple concept, really. Now it’s a bonus to me that others seem to enjoy reading what I write as well.

When I was very young I lived with my grandparents. Today that’s not such an uncommon thing, but in the sixties being a child of divorced parents who lived with her grandparents was unique to say the least. My grandmother was very sick and I often had to stay home from school to care for her. She was mostly bedridden and slept a lot, so the dog and I were on our own. All my friends were in school and I never cared for game shows or soap operas.


There was no Netflix or digital books. Our house was filled with books, but more of them were for adults than a little girl. I had my own collection, but I’d read through them and often getting to a library to find other books wasn’t an option. Some days I really wasn’t in the mood to re-read, so I began to write. I wanted stories about adventure and space travel and horses, so I created them. Sometimes all in one story! That simple act allowed me to express myself and explore with my imagination. When I didn’t write, I went back and read my stories.

It was fun.

Eventually I learned what it was to be a published author and those were the people who created the books stored in our family room. I wanted to be one of those people. To me writing has never hard work, but something that seemed as natural as breathing. It’s my happy place after a day of dealing with the world.

So, to answer the question why I write? The answer is simple. I can’t not write.



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Why I Write Part One


Hello, and welcome to another day on Author’s Speak. I’ve decided to spend some time talking about not only why I write, but why I write what I write.

Go ahead, say that ten times fast!

I thought I’d start with my chosen genre and branch out from there.

People ask why don’t you write serious/real books and how come romance? Some go a step farther and inquire why M/M romance or books with LGBTQ+ characters as leads?

Um…romance books are real and it’s a huge genre! There is something for everyone no matter if the characters are gay, straight or Martian.


Okay, I’m the first to admit most of my books aren’t serious in nature or horribly angsty, but not every book needs to be. More on the nitty gritty of that next month.

My initial response to why write LGBTQ+ characters, specifically gay men is simply: “I like it.” That’s sort of stating the obvious and doesn’t really offer much in the way of deep, thoughtful insight. However, I could almost see those reading my answer (the similar answers by other authors) sagely nodding their heads in agreement.

It’s like asking the reader, why do you read this genre? Gee, ‘cause they like it, silly, would be the universal answer. For me the real reason goes deeper.

Which brings me back to the question of why two men? Not two women or a man and woman?

Sooo….I’m out walking the dog one day, contemplating the affairs of my writing and while waiting on my cute canine companion to water some dead leaves I stumbled upon an epiphany about myself and why it is I enjoy reading and writing M/M romance. My answer goes much farther back to a time long before I became aware of gay romance or read that first story.


It’s because of my grandfather, who was, as far as I know, a completely straight, pretty conservative man. Interesting how things work out.

He also loved to read and watch television.

I was raised by this man, and lived in a predominantly male household. From the time I was a very little girl I was constantly telling a story and that evolved into writing them when I learned to string letters to words and words to sentences and sentences to paragraphs and…okay I can do this all day, you get the idea. As far back as I can remember this man told me I should be a writer.

Specifically, a mystery writer. That was his favorite genre.

circles-banner-926-173-whiteI’m sure M/M romance is not what he’d had in mind, but I think he’d be happy knowing I was being published and people were reading and enjoying my stories.

My grandfather was a huge fan of reading the mystery, the more suspense and action the better. Throw in some political intrigue and he thought it was perfect. I grew up surrounded by books, literally hundreds that were in a basement library he built by hand. He was a woodworker by hobby, much like Todd Ruger, one of the main characters of my Sentries series. All my grandfather’s favorite books had a common theme of two men, detectives or cops or whatever that were partners and friends. Men who cared deeply for one another.

Enter the male bonding theme, two men with a connection, deep love and respect for one another was presented to me when I was so young I couldn’t even read.

In fact, I was immersed in it.

Grandpa did more than read, he loved sports, but a physical problem kept him from being very active, so he watched television. Often while reading. Another habit from Grandpa, I often read or write while watching TV. For years I watched football, baseball and basketball with him. In between there were shows that were the staple of the television industry at the time, Combat, Five O’Clock HighRat PatrolGunsmokeBonanzaStar TrekBatman, the list goes on. They all had the commonality of men bonding, be they friends, fathers and sons, or brothers it didn’t matter. I was immersed from a very young age in stories where the central characters were men. Men who loved one another, even if it wasn’t in the romantic sense.


My favorite was Maverick. I’ll still watch that show when given the opportunity. Two brothers who every week found some mystery to solve, or wrong to put right or simply engaged in a good-guy/bad-guy chase down a deserted road and into a box canyon. From that show and those men I learned a love of a good (fictional of course) bar brawl, gun fight, chase, ghost story and an appreciation for taking a gamble in life. Times have changed and in the decades between Maverick and now there have been dozens, if not hundreds, of shows and books revolving around two men in some sort of close, loving relationship.

Okay, these guys weren’t in romantic relationships, but the groundwork for that next step was laid down and mapped out in my mind long ago and far away.

Is it really such a wonder that from there the leap to gay men and their close romantic relationships was made?

The main characters of my books are no different than the men of countless pieces of literature or viewing I grew up loving. They just have one more aspect to their lives and relationship: that of a soul bonded, mated, or married romantic couple. The heroes in my books have lovers as well as partners who are men. Men with a great deal of love and respect between them. Now, how could you not like that?

For women to read, write and enjoy all male romance isn’t so strange. So, here I am, many (we won’t discuss the actual number, but those of you who know the shows of which I speak can work it out I’m sure) years later, a woman whose first published novel was a paranormal action/adventure with a healthy dose of romance between two men.
It makes perfect sense really, when you think about it.

I, for one, couldn’t be happier or more proud that my first published novel revolves around a theme that I loved before I knew what it was: Men loving one another, how doesn’t matter. That my first novel, Marked Yours, and the books that have followed were not only about the close bond men share, but one that allows them to take that bonding into a romantic relationship.

To answer the question of why I wrote and published in the genre of M/M romance, well it’s simple really, it’s what I love, it’s what fascinates me and fires my imagination. It’s what I grew up learning to love and I want to offer a big thank you to those that created those books and shows then brought them to life for one little girl to appreciate the male bond.

From the brothers Maverick, Cartwright, Simon and Winchester, to the buddies Matt Dillon and Chester, Starsky and Hutch, Jim Ellison and Blair Sandberg, Peter Burke and Neal Caffery, and many others, I learned how deeply men bond and love one another and came to appreciate that bond. Mostly I owe them my heartfelt gratitude.

Really, is there any other genre steeped in such tradition for me, or that would feel so natural, to write in and explore? Was there ever a question of what would be the subject matter of my published novels? Hell, no!

There is plenty of action, love and general fighting of evil in all of my books.  

Until next month,

Happy Reading!




Panel Discussion at Fictional Badass Association Annual Convention 2016

Hello and welcome to my day on Authors Speak! Lou Sylvre and I decided to do something a little different this month. A few years ago Lou came up with a concept that featured a few of our characters in a panel discussion at the annual Fictional Badass Association convention. We’ve looked in on the 2013 and 2014, but weren’t able to to attend the convention in 2015.

Several of our characters are panelists again this year! Let’s sit in one of their panels.

Place: Emotion in Motion Convention Center, Noble and Sylvre room

Date: August 19, 2016  

Time: When many convention attendees have been drinking

Panel members: Luki Vasquez, Brian Harrison, Jonas Forge, Declan

Discussion topic: Modern Surveillance and Espionage Techniques for Human and Otherwise Operatives

Moderator: C. Auguste Dupin

Lucas Coate slips behind Declan and Forge. “Do you know who is in the audience?” He stands between them with a hand on each of their shoulders.

Brian leans around Declan and smirks. “My very handsome sub for one.” He nods in Jackie’s direction. “Looking good in that dark green suit.”

Jackie, front row center, then raises a hand and winks.

Brian mouths, “Behave, devil boy,” but doesn’t get more than a sly smile and chuckle out of Jackie.

“Stop interrupting!” Lucas sputters, and then points. “It’s Sherlock Holmes!”

Forge, interested but not the least bit excited, looks out over the audience. “He looks nothing like that guy from the new Star Trek.”

“Or Iron Man.” Luki adds. “Oh look, there’s Seeley Booth. Sonny thinks he’s “cute.” (He uses air quotes, catches himself and pretends he was only fixing his curls). “Personally, I didn’t think he was real. Now that I know he is, he’d better watch his shit around Sonny. Hi, husband.” He waves to Sonny James, who is sitting three rows back with Forge’s husband, Blair, but still might have been able to read his Luki’s lips. Sonny puts a hand on his hip and raises his eyebrows—a clear warning, which Luki pretends he didn’t see.

“Hmm…Lucas also ‘claims’ to be a fan of that show. He does a running commentary on their pathological investigative techniques.” Declan looks at Lucas. “Yes, I gave away your fanboy secret.”

“Booth is a good G-man,” Forge adds and Brian nods.

Auguste Dupin takes his place behind the podium and taps the microphone a few times, sending a high pitched squeal through the room. A few attendees slap their hands over their ears. A few others take long drinks for plastic cups full of… uh, “water.”

Blair Turner leaves his seat beside Sonny and Jackie and steps onto the stage a second later. He makes some adjustments to the mic, and smiles at C. Auguste. “Big fan, sir. That should work now.”

Dupin gives Blair one slight nod. “You’re a life-saver and a very astute young man.” He eyes the microphone suspiciously. “Infernal device.”

“Yes he is,” Forge chimes in. Blair blushes and returns to his seat.

Jackie gives him a thumbs up and grins. “They’re nothing without us.”

Blair nods. “True.”

“Behind every good Brian Harrison is a me,” Jackie adds, laughing.

“Behind every good detective is his tech guy,” Blair adds, pointing to himself.

Auguste clears his throat and speaks into the microphone again. “If we could get started.”

There is a bit of shuffling in the audience as Lucas makes his way down a row to an empty seat. He leans close to the man on his right. “You’re Ellery Queen.” Whispering loudly, he says, “Declan, look I’m next to Ellery Queen!”

Declan shifts in his chair, looks at the podium and sips his water.

Forge nudges Luki’s elbow and points to Declan. “Deadly assassin of the night.” Then he motions with one finger to Lucas Coate. “And his soul mate, Lucas.”

“Werewolves are very outgoing,” Luki observes, and Forge arches an eyebrow and nods.

Dupin gives them a dirty look and raises his voice. “As I was saying, this is a panel discussion on modern surveillance techniques for human and non-human investigators.” He motions to Forge and Declan. “We have with us today two vampire representatives from the Vampire Guard. Declan specializes in undercover—”

“He’s great under the covers,” Lucas chimes in. Forge covers his mouth with one hand and coughs while Declan shakes his head, rubbing his forehead.

“—undercover and has chameleon like abilities to infiltrate a target gang. Jonas Forge is a prior homicide detective turned covert operative.” Dupin then motions toward Brian. “The human panelists are Mr. Harrison, formerly an inspector with Scotland Yard, and last but certainly not least is Mr. Luki Vasquez, founder and CEO of Vasquez Security.”

Forge leans toward Declan. “Dupin looks hungry, don’t you think?” When Declan doesn’t even look at him, Forge shakes his head. “Maybe it’s me. I’m hungry. You know, my luggage was lost, with all my supplies.”

“You’re always hungry,” Declan states and slides a bowl of peanuts toward Forge. “Have a snack. I told you I have extra blood packets and will give you one later.”

“Declan,” Forge begins, making a motion with his hand to indicate Declan should quiet down. “Mr. Dupin is trying to get the panel started.”

Declan snorts and shakes his head.

“Good luck with that,” Luki says. “I hear the guy hardly ever leaves his house. And he writes poetry. I hope he doesn’t have anything like a recital planned.”

Sonny James stands up, eyes blazing as he makes his way out of the row of seats toward the stage. Luki believes Sonny’s eyes and ears should be studied by science. Sonny can hear a whisper two states away.

“Man, your hearing is good. Are you sure you’re not a vampire?” Lucas asks as Sonny storms by him.

“Luki Vasquez! I am surprised at you,” Sonny says once he’s planted himself on the stage, one hand on his hip, the other protectively on Dupin’s shoulder. “I’m sure you could manage to be civil. I’d like to remind you that Monsieur Dupin has been a fictional human detective for almost two centuries. You are a babe in the woods!”

Luki hangs his head and mumbles, “Sorry.”

“Don’t mope, husband. You know I love you. Just try to be nice, please.”

Mercí, Monsieur James,” Dupin says. “I am gratified, but not surprised by your gallant errantry in quieting the voices of those who, by means of nonsensical puns, would stand in the way of my effort to encourage discourse upon the superior analytic powers of the fictional detective, human and otherwise, such as myself, Monsieur Holmes”—he nods toward that gentleman in the audience and receives a smug nod on return—“and allegedly those four with whom I share the honor of this venerable stage.”

Sonny nods enthusiastically, mostly happy that the sentence had at last come to an end. As he begins to move off the stage toward his seat, he can’t help but reflect upon the vast difference between this man’s moderator style and that of Frodo Baggins, who took the chair in 2014.

Dupin said, “He is a very little fellow, that’s true, and would do better for the Théâtre des Variétés.”

Sonny stops, “Wha…?”

“Mr. Baggins,” Dupin explains. “And those are the same words I long ago spoke to my friend in Paris, as recorded by that illustrious man of the pen, Edgar Allan Poe, which caused him—my friend, that is—to ask me how I deduced that he was thinking about Chantilly. I will now elucidate the manner in which I arrived at the knowledge that you were thinking of—”

Sonny smiles and says, “Oh, no. Please, that’s fine,” while hurrying off the stage.

Declan comments to Forge, “Jackie Vasquez stands out in a crowd. He’s quite stunning and his heartbeat is very steady. You know, with training, if he was turned and acquired a soul mate he’d make a fine agent for The Guard.”

Brian turns immediately toward Declan, prepared to fight even a vampire to protect his lover, sub, and—he hopes—soon to be fiancé.

Luki stands up—which gets everyone’s attention excepting Sonny and those in the audience who have fallen asleep. “Let’s talk about guns!”

“I love guns!” Forge jumps in immediately. “I rarely have to use them—” his eyes turn solid blue and his fangs drop for a few seconds before he appears human again. “—but when I do I—”

“He’s trying to say he likes the big guns,” Blair pipes up from the audience. When everyone turns to look at him he blushes deep red. “Um, I mean, you know, rifles and not the little ones.” He sinks down in his seat.

“But when I do, I appreciate a good, solid, state of the art firearm,” Forge finishes.

“Perhaps you could expound upon the ever changing and fascinating subject of how, in this day and age of almost magical means of espionage that uses more than simply pen and paper, a keen eye and sharp wit to follow and apprehend a vile perpetrator?” Dupin asked.

Brian leans closer to Forge. “Do you think he’s finished his question? Seems short for him.”

Forge shrugs and Declan stands up. “Bon après-midi Monsieur Dupin.” Then he repeats in English, “Good afternoon, Mr. Dupin.”

Dupin’s face lights up. “You speak French!”

Declan bows slightly. “I was born in Paris in 1721.”

“Actually he’s nobility, Marquis de—” Forge stops talking abruptly and reaches down to grab at his foot Declan has just stomped on.

“I prefer the name Declan.”

“He’s killed for less than knowing his real name,” Lucas and Blair chime from the audience.

“Like a damn demon,” Forge grumbles. “Can’t know my real name.”

Brian Harrison leans forward and covers his face, trying desperately to stop the laughter he’s consumed with.

“As I was saying,” Declan raises his voice ever so slightly. “We vampires have an advantage because our hearing is so sensitive, electronic means are often unnecessary.”

“And don’t forget the ninja fast moves,” Lucas adds. He nudges Ellery Queen and points to Declan. “Those vamps can move so fast it’s like they’re here one second and there the next.”

“That’s because we are,” Forge says.

“That must be handy,” Brian says and Forge nods.

Luki says, defensively, “I’m fast!”

Sonny is looking down at his program, and it’s not clear he’s even aware he speaks aloud. “Yup! Fast is the word. Wham bam.”

All eyes turn toward Luki, whose mouth is hanging open. He wipes sudden sweat from his brow. “Not that kind of wham bam. That isn’t what he meant! Sonny, baby, tell them that isn’t what you meant.”

Sonny looks up from his program, confused, and then gets a horrified look on his face. “No! No that is not at all what I meant. I mean… Sorry, husband!”

Sonny looks so miserable, and Luki loves him so much, so he ignores his own mortification. “Never mind, sweetie. It’s okay. I don’t care what they think anyway.”

The other panelists, most of the audience, and even Dupin chorus, “Aaaawww.”

Luki says, “So about those guns. I myself far prefer Sig for a handgun. I had a pretty little Beretta once, but… one terrible day I saw Sonny holding it to someone’s head. Lost its charm.”

Brian perks up. Here’s a subject he doesn’t mind talking about. “Man, when I was working in England, no guns! Imagine being a cop investigating murders in a metropolis with 10,000 dark alleys, and no gun!”

“Mr. Harrison, getting vampire skills is simply a matter of being turned. Then not having a gun will be far less a problem,” Declan points out. “If you’re interested…”

Brian seems to consider it for a few seconds before Luki and Jackie say sternly, “No.”

“Now that I’m going back to work for you Luki, things will be different.”

“Not too terribly different, I hope, Brian. You’ll be behind a desk at least half the time, and we rarely have to shoot anybody for a client. Although I did once have to shoot the client… But that’s a tale for another time. Still have your uncle’s Colt?”

“Of course. Damn fine gun,” Brian says.

Forge says, “To heck with handguns. I never use a gun in any situation that requires less than an M16.”

Luki laughs, and shakes his head. “You do know I’m former ATF, right? Still have ties…”

Not at all worried, Forge shrugs and says, “Bring it, man!” He flashes his detective’s badge with the word retired across the bottom.

Meanwhile, Dupin has been fidgeting at the podium and occasionally wiping his increasingly sweaty brow. He’s tried to interrupt, saying “S-s-sirs” several times, but none of the panelists have noticed.

Fortunately, Jackie and Blair have seen him, and they apparently both empathize. “Hey,” they both say, almost simultaneously.

All the panelists close their mouths and look toward the men in the audience.

Jackie continues. “Mr. Dupin has been trying to get your attention”—he stops, and in a fair imitation of his uncle Sonny, puts his hands on his hips and emphasizes the next word especially for Brian’s benefit “—Sir!’

Blair says, “Yeah, Forge. What he said.”

Sherlock Holmes stands, puts his hands behind his back and says, “I’ve deduced, Misters Forge and Harrison, that your respective lovers….”

Luki interrupts, “Is Watson here, Mr. Holmes? He knows a little something about guns.”

Dupin gets right up on top of the microphone and says, “Gentlemen! Here is a question from the audience.” Everyone is shocked into silence by the fact that the man asserted himself, so he continues. “Guns are fine in a confrontation, but you are supposed to be detectives. What are your favorite tools of detection?”

Brian says, “Internet.”

Forge says, “Superhuman strength and speed combined with extremely sensitive hearing. I can tell if someone is lying by how their heartbeat changes.”

Declan speaks authoritatively. “I’ve been around a long while; hard to put anything over on me since I’ve been a student of human behavior for a very long time. Plus, my senses are so sharp I just heard that guy in last row surreptitiously scratch his…” He holds Luki’s watch out to him and smiles mischievously. “And I can catch a thief because I am one.”

Luki has been looking thoughtful, chewing his lip while the others were speaking. The answer comes to him in just that moment, and he blurts it out. “Jude!” Then he rolls his eyes at Declan and snatches his watch.

Brian nods knowingly, but Dupin, Forge, and Declan ask together, “Jude?”

Luki says, “Yes. Jude. My office admin. She can do anything.”

Dupin gets up close to the mic again, as if about to assert control over the suddenly guffawing crowd, but a woman with “STAFF” on the back of her shirt comes in, steps onto the stage, and over to the mic.

“Lara Croft, Tomb Raider,” Brian exclaims. “Speaking of badass!”

But no one is listening. Ms. Croft has thanked Dupin and the panel for the “uh… ahem… enlightening discussion,” and the audience, it seems is racing en masse to get a table at the bar.


The Gents:

Sonny James & Luki Vasquez

VJ bundle new cover

Dreamspinner Press






Brian Harrison & Jackie Vasquez

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Dreamspinner Press






Jonas Forge & Blair Turner; Declan and Lucas Coate


DSP Publications






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Dreamspinner Press





Until next month

Elizabeth Noble

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Stop Talking About It


This is an article I wrote a year or so ago for another blog. I’m cheating this month because I’m on the deadline train and I like the article and want to rewrite it a bit and re-share.

Hope that’s okay!

I wish there wasn’t a gay fiction category.

There are many reasons people read and write fiction of any genre with gay characters. My favorite type of story is not the one where the focus is on a character being gay. I love the story where the main character(s) just happen to be gay. Being gay shouldn’t be considered a character flaw so it stands to reason it shouldn’t be what defines a character.

I think it’s great when a book/TV show/movie has characters that also happen to be gay. Their sexual orientation doesn’t need to be the story line.

The Syfy Channel is an excellent example of doing just this. Yes, this is television, not books, however script writing is still writing and all movies/TV shows start out in a written form. LGBT representation is wide-spread in Syfy’s original programming. They don’t shout about it, or advertise it and the importance of the character is not the fact that he or she is gay or a lesbian or bi. These facts are one aspect of the many layers of a character.

One of the best examples of how Syfy channel has accomplished this is the show Warehouse 13 (great, fun show, give it a watch if you haven’t already). From the start the LGBT community has been represented. In season 3 they added a gay character to the regular cast, a former ATF agent, Steve Jinks…aka Jinks or Jinky on the show. He’s also a Buddhist and has recently ended a long term relationship with a man who is US Marshal (cha-ching).

Jinks is badass. He’s a wonderful, multi-layered character who also happens to be gay. He’s got an awesome story line that has nothing to do with his being gay. There is no real angsting over will the other characters accept him or not, which is refreshing. They take his being gay as just him. They are supportive when they have to work with Jink’s ex, asking if they should hate him, because they could do that. Later Jinks and his ex discuss what went wrong between them.

There is a second character, a woman HG Wells, and she’s openly bi. As with Jinks that’s not what is important about her character. She’s one of those good bad guys. The fact she’s bi comes out during her story line but isn’t the focus of her story. Her character has layers upon layers and they all come together to create a memorable, fascinating character.

Let’s not forget Caprica with a gay man who was an enforcer!

The Star Trek franchise is taking the same approach. From the first appearance Star Trek has always boldly gone… and they’re not stopping now. Hikaru Sulu, another badass character was recently revealed as gay. It’s not a big announcement, I understand there’s a family picture and some mention of his husband. How awesome is that? The focus is on the man and his part in the story, not who he goes to bed with at night.

These characters are treated like all the other characters on the show. They are what they are and their story lines is what is important. The focus of their character is what they do, not who they sleep with. I think that goes a long way in promoting the LGBT community in general.

There is certainly a place in literature for the coming out or coming of age traditional LGBT story and those stories need to be told. However, we must also have a place for this other type of story where there are gay characters but the story doesn’t revolve around that aspect of the characters.

Actor Morgan Freeman made a wonderful statement about Black History month that can also apply to LGBT people. He basically says to stop prejudice and bias we need to stop talking about it. The Syfy Channel, Star Trek franchise and publishers such as DSP Publications have done an amazing job of showing how to do just that.

“Stop talking about it. I’m going to stop calling you a white man, and I’m going to ask you to stop calling me a black man. I know you as Mike Wallace. You know me as Morgan Freeman.”– Morgan Freeman.


Visit Elizabeth Noble at her website.

It’s All About Family

Hello! I’m Elizabeth Noble and I’m another of the authors Lou has offered a monthly space for a blog post. I’ll be posting on the 19th of each month.

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Today is Father’s Day in the United States. Happy Father’s Day to all you dads everywhere. Whether your children have two legs or four, are teeny tiny tots or grown and grumpy this day is for you!



I think a common question I’m asked is why do I write in the genre I do? Why write gay romance? I have a variety of answers depending on the situation and how chatty I’m feeling at that moment. Those answers range from ‘because I like it’ to much longer and more detailed responses.

In all honesty it’s not something I give a huge amount of thought to unless the question is put to me.

What I do give a ridiculous amount of thought to are creating the plots for the books I write. Romance books are about, well romance, right? Two people meet, in the case of my books, two men, during the course of the story they’re attracted to each other, develop feelings for each other and finally form a–hopefully–lasting bond. The characters are different, the backdrops vary, but the idea is the same: they form a family.


I’m all about family of choice. When we read a romance novel there is the excitement of the couple meeting, will they get along, will they connect, will they be kept apart?

Then yes, finally our couple shares a kiss and kiss leads to more. By the end of the book what was two separate people have come together and formed a family. A family of choice.

Each of my novels has the family in a different stage of its development.


In Jewel Cave and during most of the Sentries series the couples were established. The family was formed. Clint and Griff from Jewel Cave have two dogs, and Todd and Nick from Sentries have their horses and an extensive network of close friends who are more like extended family.


Gone Away has two men reuniting after a few years apart, so this is a family coming together again. They’ve grown and like many families realize the reasons for separating aren’t nearly as important as why they belong together.


The family created in The Vampire Guard series is a little different. This is a larger family, two couples. These four men have complicated and layered relationships with one another. Each couple have their romantic relationship. In addition there are the relationships between each team member. It’s what makes them not only a team but a family of choice.


These men will do anything for one another, no matter what personal danger they may face.

When a writer creates a romance novel they’re inviting us on the inside of something very special. A new family is budding, an existing family is changing and blooming into something different, and hopefully better. The main characters face more challenges than simply getting beyond that first kiss. They’re creating traditions, forging alliances and reinforcing love so it can last.

That’s really the happiest ending of all.

Until next month! Happy Reading,


Emotion in Motion

The Vampire Guard

Vamp Guard business cards front copy