One of Publishing’s Unsung Heroes

Hello, I’m Elizabeth Noble and thank you for stopping by today! Thanks to Lou for hosting this site and giving me a spot to post every month.

When writing a story there comes a time when there’s a whole finished manuscript that will eventually become a book. The next logical step in the writing journey is submitting the book to a publisher. That’s a boring process which mainly consists of a lot of waiting for an answer.

We’ll skip that part and jump to the fun part.

New book release day!

There’s a nice, shiny, new book being turned loose into the world.

One would think that all the hard work is finished, it’s time to kick back, enjoy the new release and work on other projects.

Yeah. Not so fast, Sparky.

Let’s back track to that submission part for a few minutes. Publishers have things called ‘author guidelines’, most have those instructions on their websites and they outline the process of placing a manuscript with them. Some publishers ask a potential author to explain their marketing plan and if they have an established fanbase, or how they plan to acquire one.

Huh? What? I have to market my book?

Yep, Sparky, you do.

Most authors probably don’t have degrees in marketing, or even office experience at a public relations company. That means once a writer becomes a professional author they get a crash course in marketing and promoting their book.

Yes, publishers do some of that work and employ people to help out and offer advice, but the bulk of that job falls to authors. There are many varied and sundry ways to go about that marketing. One popular method is the blog tour.

What exactly is this blog tour creature? Well, just what it sounds like. An author will have excerpts of their new book, maybe a post talking about something (like this one), a contest and of course buy links so readers can purchase said book, on a different blog every week or so.

There are a number of blogs, large and small, for authors to approach and request space. Many are run by the unsung heroes of the publishing industry: The Blog Owner/Reviewer.

Most reviewers/blog owners aren’t paid. Their jobs are a labor of love. They read books and offer reviews for other readers because they want to share a good story. It’s the reviewers who run blog websites that offer a place for authors to find new readers, inform existing fans of new releases and generally market our books.

Oh, and they do all that without charging authors. Yes, some blogs get a little bit of income participating in programs like Amazon associates, or offering paid for ad space. However, ninety percent of what you see on the many book review sites is all done free of charge. Review blogs ask only a few things in return for their services. Something interesting for their readers to read and a chance to win a prize. If they review a book, that’s done without a charge, other than they’re provided with a copy of the book.

So, the next time you stop by a blog to read a review, enter a contest or catch up on what one of your favorite authors is doing take a minute to acknowledge the people who run that blog. Maybe say thanks. Without them we’d all have a much more difficult time finding a good book to read.

Until next time happy reading…and oh yeah, check out my upcoming release, High Test. It’s got a great blog tour thanks to so many blog owners/reviewers! Leave me a comment on how you feel about blog tours to be entered into a drawing for a free eBook off my back list, new release, bundles and anthologies excluded. Prizes will be made available through the Dreamspinner Press webstore.

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Paperback 

Blog Tour/Excerpt

 

Elizabeth

www.elizabeth-noble.com

More Writing Rituals and Tools

 

Hello there and welcome back! I missed last month, sorry about that.

Last time I talked about my primary writing tool, the digital story bible.

This month I’m going to delve into another step in my rather chaotic process. The writing journal.

Beginning when I was very young, I wrote in a notebook I carried with me. When I was in school it blended in with my other school books, later I switched to smaller ones that could more easily fit into a bag or pocket.

In the years since I’ve switched to a digital format. I keep all my thoughts and ideas in a digital journal, it’s one of the notebooks in my OneNote that I talked about in my last post.

I have, in part, returned to physical notebooks and journals in the last six months or so. This happened for a variety of reasons and I partially blame Grace Duncan (fellow author) and Elizabeth North (owner of Dreamspinner Press).

Every year Dreamspinner Press hosts an author workshop and all those in attendance are given a nice welcome/gift bag. There’s the obligatory beverage receptacle (travel mug, water tumbler with straw) with the Dreamspinner logo, name tag and lanyard and lovely journals among other things. Every year is a little bit different.

Anyway, I’ve been keeping these super sweet journals on a shelf in my office. For the longest time I was afraid to use them, I might ruin them or not organize them the right way.

Grace pointed out there was no right way and leaving these journals sit unused just wasn’t right!

So, determined to put them to use, I bought some colorful stick on tab dividers and made one journal into a reference book. In there I keep things like the HTML codes I use on my website and in my newsletter, a list of reviewers and what format book they prefer. Who to go to for a blog tour, dos and don’ts of social media and promotions and other miscellaneous information.

Grace convinced me to try using one for story development and the third I plan to use as a coding notebook. I began taking coding classes and believe it or not, much of the early stages of website coding is done on paper! Go figure. The Dreamspinner journal is a perfect size for coding projects. All that aside, they’re pretty impressive looking.

At work I help maintain much of the machinery that runs our lab. I need to have a list of some error codes and remember how to reset software. I use a little notebook with a homemade suede cover for my personal reference. We have shelves full of user guides, but I find a few notes jotted down of the most commonly needed tasks is easier and simpler. Using my OneNote was hit or miss since the building is cinder-block and the WiFi is sketchy at best. One draw back with digital journals is you do need a way to be online to use them. Besides, handing my phone over to a coworker who needed the information wasn’t something I was comfortable with, a small notebook was a good work-around. And it’s cute!

To further my handwritten journal evolution I discovered refillable travel journals. These are perfect and pretty cool looking. Seriously, I’m so much about aesthetics I sometimes think I was an interior designer in a past life. I love color and texture in everything! Travel journals not only have removable/movable/refillable pages but many come in appealing colors and textures.

Since I’m not really permitted to be on my cell phone, or a tablet, at work, other than on breaks I would often make notes on scraps of paper. Little, pocket-sized journals are easy to carry and fun to use. I also tend not to misplace, throw out or otherwise lose them like I did with the scraps of paper.

In this picture you can see my big DSP journals, my little handmade one and then a few travel journals I purchased or were given to me as a gift.

I’ve read a few articles that explain the difference between how our minds work when we use a digital format and when we old school it and use paper and pen. (Of course I have fun colored pencils and gel pens to go with my journals!) Our brains actually fire different synapses and different parts are engaged depending on whether we type out notes or hand-write them.

For me handwritten notes seems to bring out the most creativity and that’s how I’ve been brainstorming. Everything I write down goes into my digital journal because the handwritten stuff looks like this:

As you can see, it’s a general mishmash and very unorganized. Writing my bits of ideas out gets the creative juices going. Transferring those ideas to my digital formats organizes them. It’s there I add pics, maps and research links.

My system is ever evolving, hopefully for the better. What I like the best about both methods, digital and physical is they’re portable. I love have access to all my writerly stuff all the time everywhere I go. (I’m sure there’s a blog post in that statement somewhere.)

Every writer needs to develop their own system that works for them. We’re creative types so, at least for me, the tools I use have to be appealing to look at, nice to hold and make me go ‘ooohhh‘ even just a little bit.

Until next month!

Anyone who would like to check out the products of my insane scribbling, it’s all on my website! Click on the banner below to take a journey to Emotion in Motion.

Happy Reading!

Elizabeth Noble

www.elizabeth-noble.com

 

 

Writing Rituals… or the things I do to write a novel…the story bible

Happy one year to Authors Speak. My first post was a year ago this month! Thank you Lou Sylvre for all you do for this group.

One of the things I’m often asked as a writer is: how do you write a whole book?

I don’t have a concept of a life without creating a story and writing it down. I have, literally, done this in some form for my entire life. Writing is second nature and storytelling is ingrained to the point I can’t not write.

The drive and desire to write does not create books, screenplays and poetry. Telling the story is the end result but it’s only one part of the process.

We writers are a fickle lot and there are an infinite number of ways to create that product, a completed novel (or screenplay, etc). The simple fact is, however, the creation of all stories does have a few common elements. It’s how each writer goes about organizing and using those elements that is individual to each and every one of us.

So, since this article is about me, I’m going to talk about what I do—my rituals—to write a novel. Firstly, I write novels, not screenplays or other forms of written works, so that in itself dictates a number of my writing rituals and tools.

A book is a book, right? Doesn’t matter if it’s fiction, non-fiction or part of a series. They’re all books, aren’t they?

Wrong.

Every so often I’m asked to write something for a friend or coworker that isn’t fiction. It’s sort of like training to compete in one sport then trying to switch for a day to another sport. Yeah, you can muddle on through and probably not embarrass yourself, but you won’t be in the best form.

Everything I do in the course of creating and writing a book centers around the fact that book is fiction and a novel.

The first thing that happens when I set about creating a new novel is the basic plot idea. For me, plot and title come first. After I have those I begin plugging in characters and locations.

My initial ritual with a new novel or series is making a list of plot points. The order doesn’t matter and is likely to change, but I want a general idea of major events in every story. If the initial story is going to be part of a series I make a separate list of major events I’d like to include in the series.

The next step I take is to plan out where my story will take place. For that I use maps, books and the world’s best location explorer, the internet. Specifically, Google Earth and maps.

This is where the creation of my story/series bible begins. I have a bible for each series, and for every book within a series. I think all the authors I personally know have some form of bible for their works. For me, setting up my bible and organizing it, filling it with research, scene ideas and reference photos is one of my very most important writing rituals.

This is a page from the bible for Gone Away. There are personality traits for the two main characters, inspiration photos and links to research. This page is what I call my basic story board. It holds all my general ideas. Eventually I’ll create individual pages for the characters, plot, location and so on that has much more detail.

Some people use paper notebooks, I know others who employ index cards or journals. This is the digital age, and all of those tools have been recreated in the virtual world.

I use OneNote, which is a digital notebook system. It can be used on a computer, tablet or phone, so I have it with me wherever I go. At one time I figured out that if my OneNote notebooks for the Sentries series was somehow transformed to traditional paper notebooks each one would be hundreds of pages long and probably form a stack about three feet high.

I love my digital bibles. They are filled with photos, links and articles and become a scrapbook for every project. If I have an idea to use a waterfall or certain type of car in a story I can collect images and details, putting them on my digital pages. As I write it’s helpful to go back and refresh my memory with a visual image or check details from articles and links I’ve saved. If I’m planning a series I keep a list of what needs to be included in book #1 as foreshadowing for later books. On the reverse side of that I have other notebook pages with lists of events and characters from earlier books to reference in later books in a series.

This is one of the dozens of pages created for The Vampire Guard series and contains info on the organization featured in the series and some of the secondary characters.

Another nice feature of using a digital system is I can easily move pictures, information and links from one bible to another.

My final step before beginning the actual writing is characters. There is so much of a character that never makes it into a book. I know all sorts of details, childhood pets, favorite color and what kind of pizza they like! Every detail that comes to me about a character is recorded in case I need to use it. Images go in the character sections as well. Photos of people who look like my characters are a helpful reference when writing descriptions.

For me creation of my bible is one of the most enjoyable aspects of writing a novel. As I work on each bible the story begins to gel in my mind. The plot ideas and characters start to take on a life of their own and the story begins to play in my head. From there on it’s simply a matter of recording that story.

More on that another time.

http://www.elizabeth-noble.com/

What’s in a Name

Recently, out of nowhere, I was contacted by an author explaining she was setting up a blog tour for her very first release. In her email she mentioned the names of a few people and it seemed she was using them for references and I was supposed to know who they were. I didn’t, however, I knew right away what was going on.

See, there is another Elizabeth Noble and she writes het romance. I believe she lives in England and is about ten years younger than I am.

I said, yes, of course I had blog space for another author and her debut novel. The book sounded really interesting, too. I wrote back, saying I wanted to be sure she didn’t have me confused with the other author. I gave her the link to my website and went on to say how wonderful it would be to have her as a guest. Lots of people read both MM and Het romance, something I pointed out. Maybe she’d find some new readers. Maybe I would. I looked forward to working with her.

I never heard back from her. Very sad.

I don’t know anything about the other Elizabeth Noble except what’s listed in her bio. I have no idea if that’s her real name or a pen name.

The name I go by, Elizabeth Noble, is sort of my pen name, but it’s also my real name. I’m not sure how others go about deciding on a pen name, but I didn’t have to look far for mine.

I was born Laura Elizabeth Noble. My surname has twice changed for different reasons, but the Laura and the Elizabeth have remained the same.

So, see, really Elizabeth Noble is my actual name. I chose to use that variation for a few reasons. I always liked my middle name and when I was little I tried to get people to call me Elizabeth, but it never took.

I opted to use Noble because that’s who I originally was, the real me so to speak. It’s also an easily remembered and spelled name. My legal surname is longer, sorta hard to spell and some people find it difficult to pronounce. It’s one of those names that spells and says exactly how it looks, but still trips people up.

My father’s name was Bernie Noble. At one time he was a bit famous and a photographer for The Cleveland Press newspaper.

I can’t take a decent photograph to save my life, or anyone else’s… go figure.

Bernie Noble, however, could take a decent photograph.

This picture sits on a shelf next to my desk. It’s a photo Bernie took that was later entered into a photography show and competition. He did a lot of that sort of thing. I like it because of the mouse sitting on the cat’s head. My father was a big cat lover.

Being the head photographer for The Cleveland Press for a few decades (and a professional photographer all his adult life) he took a lot of pictures.

One, however, was really special.

In 1963 Bernie took a photograph of US President Eisenhower which was later selected by his wife, Mamie for use with the stamp that was issued commemorating him. It was a six cent stamp!

Sitting in my attic is a copy of that photograph as well as one of my father holding the photograph. I have no idea who took that photo, I’m guessing one of his coworkers at the newspaper for a little article they did at the time.

           

So, that’s a little bit of history surrounding my pen name.

Don’t forget to enter our Merry May giveaway for a chance to win a Kindle Fire and books!

Until next time,

Happy Reading!

Elizabeth Noble

Giving Back

 

Many years ago, when my children were little and my youngest son was in the fourth grade or so his class did a project for Thanksgiving about what they were grateful for. One of the things on his list was that we always had a phone and our utilities were never shut off.

That was a real WOW moment for me.

There was a time that broke was a step up in the world. However, there was never a time we didn’t have a home, or heat or food. Sometimes the home was a tiny apartment that we squeezed into and the food was hot dogs and peanut butter and jelly.

Things are a bit different now. My kids are a dog and cat. More months than not I rob Peter to pay Paul and something is always paid late. But, it all gets paid.

I still have a home–one I own now. I have a car, something I couldn’t always afford. The neighborhood I live in is much better, and I can buy groceries.

These changes are a result, in part, of the fact I now publish books. People pay for those books, which has added to my income. I’m extremely grateful for that extra income and it makes a huge difference in my life.

Along the way from published to royalty check there are a number of people who help authors out free of charge. They give their time and energy to creating blogs where books can be showcased, increasing exposure. They offer reviews, post interviews and run contests.

These blog owners and their reviewers help my career as an author a lot. So, when one of them asks for help raising money for a worthwhile charity there is no way I’d refuse.

See, there are an awful lot of people who, through no fault of their own, don’t have a home, or enough to eat. They might face bullying because they’re part of the LGBTQ+ population. Maybe there are health issues they face and don’t know where to go for treatment.

The point is for many young people times are bleak and they may feel suicide is their only option.

Which it’s not.

I have always liked to give back, be it with my time, my money or something else. I don’t have a lot to offer in the way of financial support, but I do have books to contribute.

When one of the blog owners I work with regularly put out a call for a fundraising project I jumped at the chance.

Kim from Kimmer’s Erotic Book Blog came up with the idea to sell bundles of books at a discount and donate the proceeds to the Trevor Project, which supports LGBTQ+ youth in the United States.

I’m willing to bet everyone reading this post buys books. Here’s a great way to help someone less fortunate, get your book fix, and maybe try a new author. (ppsssttt…my book is the first one in the picture, Gone Away.)

It’s important to give back, even when you don’t feel very fortunate yourself. There is always someone worse off.

Oodles and goodles of book bundles be HERE!

Until next month,

Happy Reading!

Elizabeth

 

 

Ch-ch-chaaanges!

Well, hello there again and thank you for stopping by my little corner of Authors Speak at Rainbow Gate!

Writing professionally requires certain things and not all of them pertain to the technicalities of putting words together to form a story. Sometimes writers have to make choices about what to write. There is the hard reality that we have to make a living as well as writing what we love.

There is absolutely no reason one can’t do both.

That choices can be difficult if one isn’t willing to expand horizons and change a bit. However, there are a lot of choices and with a bit of thought it’s easy to discover there are other stories that need writing.

I’ve always said I’m a serial offender. I write in series. Series have much to offer in the way of extended plots and character development. It’s my writing as well as reading preference.

However stand alone books have a great deal to offer as well. Some stories don’t need four or six books to complete. There are readers who’d prefer a story be told with the covers of one book.

I decided it’s time to switch gears and write more stand alone stories. Some discussion with Lynn West, Dreamspinner Press editor in chief, helped me decide on a good direction to pursue.

Romantic suspense will still be part of my line-up, though I think the Circles series has come to an end. The next mystery will be a full length novel with more development and probably a more complicated plot. However, my mysteries will be in the same high action/adventure (sometimes in the wilderness) style as the Circles mysteries. I’ll still be working on The Vampire Guard, however it’ll be my ‘written for me’ side pet project stories. Sentries has been completed, though I may offer free stories on my website from time to time.

This isn’t the first time in my life I’ve taken a new path. I’ve always tried to live by the adage “I’m nothing if not adaptable”. Honestly, every change of direction for me has always been a good one. I’m excited over this change.

Coming soon, awaiting contract decision and in the works are two Dreamspun Desires books, a BDSM featuring an ice dancer and a hockey player. Of course there is a murder mystery planned, it will take place in Wrigleyville. There may also be a scifi romance in the future.

I hope you’ll join me in my new writing adventure!

I’m always excited and happy to take requests from readers, so if anyone has a plot bunny bouncing around you’d like to share please let me know!

Elizabeth

PS…you can find all my books on my website, click on the banner below.

There is also a great new repository site for finding Quiltbag/LGBTQ+ books. Check out Queeromance Inc.

Changes, legacies and thinky thoughts

My basement flooded recently.

It’s a special sort of treat said no one EVER!

So what the heck does this have to do with writing you ask? Well, it turns out quite a bit.

When I moved to this house twelve-ish or so years ago I had visions of using my finished basement in all sorts of grand and glorious ways. I could have a whole other floor of living space. I thought creating a living room and dining room down there would be a great place during the hot summer months. It’s nice and cool, I’d save on my electric bill.

Then the darn thing flooded–every few years. Yeah, that’s soooo much fun I can’t even begin to describe it. My oldest son (thank heavens I had the foresight to give birth to a plumber!) suggested an indoor pool during the last flood. Excuse him, he’s convinced he’s funny.

After this last flood I realized I don’t even like it down there anymore. It was time for a change. I decided I needed to move some of the shelves and furniture and things down there up into my main living space.

One of those pieces of furniture was this cute little dresser.

Since it’d been previously sitting in my basement for a decade plus I decided to go through what was stored in those drawers. Discovered something interesting.

Writers keep A LOT of paper. Lined paper, blank paper, colored paper, no pens just paper–I don’t even write by hand anymore! Some of those papers (and notebooks) had things written on them.

Writerly things.

One of those drawers was filled with different stories I’d written or begun to write. Some were from long ago when I was in school. A few were finished, others were not. I’d venture to say I could look in any closet or filing cabinet I own and find such a stash. These little writing clippets range from not so bad to OMG I hope no one ever sees these!

For the better part of the last six or so years I’ve written almost exclusively on my computer. My research, notes, ideas, visual aids are all on there. I have a few friends who’ve I tasked with the duty that if I drop dead they MUST come wipe my hard drive. I’d die of embarrassment if some of those things were seen by others.

Which is silly, I’d be dead so what’s the difference?

My recent find in that little dresser made me think, what about all that stuff I have written on paper and squirrel away throughout my house?

From a writer standpoint this stuff is awful. Gimme a break some of it was written as early as grade school! That’s not to say the ideas are horrible, some I think I might revisit and use. But the writing–gah, blah!

But then I thought how my kids make comments about my writing. Not what I write, but that I DO write. It’s part of who and what I am. My youngest son has commented numerous times the thing he remembers most about me when he was small was I was always creating stories. Writing them down and later typing them out.

Even if I think these handwritten bits and pieces of stories are horrible is it possible they might become something treasured to my children or grandchildren someday? A memento of who Mom was?

Maybe. I won’t know because of that whole being dead thing.

The fact remains, useful or not, these early stories I created do represent me. I’ve decided I’ll collect them all from their hiding places in the back of closest and forgotten drawers and put them in one place for others to find someday. If my kids don’t want them, they can toss them, no hard feelings and I’ll understand. However, it’ll be their choice. I shouldn’t take the opportunity from them to save something they might find precious and meaningful.

Now, as for the raunchy pictures that are purely research on my hard drive–they gots to go!

Until next month,

Elizabeth

To read the better stuff that is eBook compatible and not handwritten visit my WEBSITE.

 

I Write What I Love and Love What I Write

There’s a ton of advice for writers whether they be published, aspiring or true hobby writers. We’re all authors, the difference is some of us are professional authors who get paid in currency. The truth is we all get paid in compliments and reviews no matter in what the forum and format we publish. Follow the rules of grammar, research your facts and write what you know, that’s preached in dozens, if not hundreds, of books offering writing advice.

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I say don’t worry about writing what you know, you can learn about a topic you wish to include in a story.

I believe in writing what you love!

One thing we all have in common is at some point we write a story for ourselves. We write the tale we want told, the one we want to read. There are various reasons we authors write different stories. Some are continuations of other stories–the birth of the series. Others write about events in their lives or a world they created as an escape.

All of us who write stories that are shared with the public in some manner sometimes create those stories to please others. I’ve run contests where fans can choose character names, or situations one or more characters need to face in a certain story. I created an entire series from prompts offered to writers in a fandom group I once belonged to. I’ve participated in author auctions where readers bid on their favorite authors to write a story for them. The money goes to charity and they’re a lot of fun. I’ve also written stories for group projects that required adhering to a certain theme.

Those stories turned out to be good stories and were well received. Some have won amateur and professional awards.

Then there are the other books and stories. The ones I wrote for me. The ones that were total self-indulgence.

Some of those books were a bit of an experiment, the representation of stretching my writer’s wings so to speak.

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Others progress a bigger story, but are written around plots I had swimming around in my head for months or years. These were stories that include elements I’d been waiting to work into a story. I simply had to wait for the right story to come along.

 

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Then there are stories I write that fall into that pure self-indulgence category. These are the books that are truly for me. The story I wanted to tell and I don’t waiver much, if at all, from my original plot ideas.

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Each of these books have something special to me, near and dear to my heart.

Readers may be surprised to learn authors have favorites, and write books not only for their audience but themselves, but I’m here to say it’s true! Books are important to different people for many reasons. We all have our comfort reads and for me, I have my comfort writes. Even though I adore all the books I’ve written (and the fanfic), these are the books that I go back and read again and again, not as their creator and not as an author, but as Elizabeth the person, the reader.

One might think that because I created these works I’d know everything inside the covers. Not so! When I read them, or any book, as a reader more than once I always find something new. That’s the joy of reading and of writing. Discovering something that makes you feel good inside.

I’m always excited to hear from readers. If you’d like to contact me for any reason I can be at elizabeth.noble19@gmail.com, or visit my website, Emotion In Motion.

Elizabeth

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Circles

The Vampire Guard

The Sleepless City

 

Why I write (and read) fanfic

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Fan fiction, other wise known as fanfic has been around for a long time. The first official use of the term happened in 1939 and referred to amatuer science fiction as opposed to professionally written stories. The original Star Trek televison series was the source of this particular aspect of fandom.

For those of you who might not know, fanfic is just what it sounds like. It’s pieces of fiction written by fans. Today it’s spread beyond televison shows to movies, books, games, bands…just about anything really.

I wrote fanfic and I still read fanfic.

So, what’s the allure?

As often is the case, the short answer is: I like it.

The longer answer has been written about and the subject of a number of studies. Yeah, it’s that big of a thing.

As a reader fanfic offers a way to express love of your favorite characters, maybe put them in a situation not presented in the cononical version of the TV show, movie, book, whatever. There are communities dedicated to certain fandoms and the fanfic produced. People organize awards and large events to showcase stories and art. Fanart is just as big a thing as fanfic and often the two are paired together.

There are people who think this type of writing is second rate or beneath them.

I say not so.

First let’s look at the fact this promotes reading and writing. Any kid with a paper and pen can write a story or draw a picture. It’s easy when they already have an established world and characters they know to work with. It doesn’t have to be good. The point is those who that might not otherwise pick up a book, let alone try to write one, do just that. If one really becomes active and participate in certain events they learn to write on a deadline, edit and deal with critism.

All very valuable life tools.

Why did I write fanfic?

The short answer is: I could.

Becoming involved in a fandom and writing fanfic did a lot for me. First, and foremost it was fun. I rediscovered my love of writing and that writing came very easily because certain aspects of the story were already laid out. I made friends I still have today. I was given valuable experiences with editors when my work was published in fanzines. I eventually made the jump to writing original fiction professionally, but for many people it remains a creative outlet and hobby. In general it’s an excellent learning ground.

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Feed back from those who read my fanfic is in part what gave me the courage to take the next step and begin submitting manuscripts again. After trying for years and never quite making it I’d given up. It also opened up a whole new genre to me. M/M fiction. While working on various stories, some M/M, some not, I honed my writng skills in a safe, supportive place.

Since I know someone will ask, I wrote in the Supernatural fandom. If you’re curious here are links to two of my stories.

Slash: Crystal Bulls of Thera this story was written for something known as a Big Bang. Many authors and artists come together to create works of fanfic that are then posted on one site. The theme was taking Disney movies and re-tell that story. It’s M/M romance.

Not Slash: What You Feel this story was written as a fundraiser. A group of fans auctioned off fanfic writers who’d then create a story for whoever ‘bought’ them. The money went to charity.

Both of these events are pretty popular in the fanfic world.

Today I have sixteen published novels (and three more in various stages of development) and a couple of short stories in anthologies. I owe a debt of thanks to the world of fanfic and those who love it. Fanfic was an important stepping stone to realizing my dream of becoming a published author.

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We have a rafflecopter give away going on, the winner gets books! We’re writers, of course we give away books.

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I have a special sale going on at Dreamspinner Press this weekend. Three of my books, Electric Candle, Run for the Roses and Gone Away, are 99c. You can purchase them HERE.

Little known fact, Jonas Forge from The Sleepless City and The Vampire Guard started out as a supporting character in a series of Supernatural fanfic stories. Back then he was Tim Forge, I think he liked the name change! I know I do.

I also have a newsletter that I put out three or four times a year. If you’d like to sign up you can do so HERE. And if you want super-secret uber updates I have a private Facebook group On the Patio with Elizabeth Noble. It’s low-key and fun and I occasionally give stuff away.

Until next month, happy reading!

Elizabeth

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Why I Write

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Hello!

Has it been a month already? Well I guess it has. Welcome back for another of my posts on Authors Speak.

Last month I rambled on a bit about why I write what I write. This month I’ve chosen a broader topic: Why I write.

I probably should have led with that, sorry.

So, let’s delve into what drives a person (me) to spend a part of everyday working on creating a story, the type of story doesn’t matter, it’s the act of writing that matters. There are a number of reasons people begin writing. Some write as a hobby or as a stress reliever. Therapists recommend writing as part of recovery for many people. It’s a way to get feelings out of your head. Once I read of a method that advocated writing down what’s bothering you on paper and then burn the paper to clear away negative emotions.

Others (me) begin as children, making up stories about the world around them. It’s a way of correcting something gone wrong or to further explore a favorite book or television show. I didn’t learn until decades later that’s called fanfiction—more on that next month.

The great thing about writing is you don’t have to be good at it, you simply have to do it. I write because it’s something I love doing. These days I write with the goal of publishing, but that wasn’t always my motivation. Having your work published isn’t what makes one a writer.

What makes someone a writer is the drive to write.

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There are people who keep what they write private for a number of reasons. You know what? That’s okay. We’re not required to share every little detail about ourselves with the world. I kept much of what I wrote very private for a long time. During school, before college, I was the girl who walked around with a notebook hidden in with my other books. I wrote down all sorts of stories and tried out different styles. When I wasn’t reading books to escape into a little fantasy world I was writing them.

I love to read and eventually discovered a sure fire way to find exactly the types of stories I want to read was to write them. It’s a simple concept, really. Now it’s a bonus to me that others seem to enjoy reading what I write as well.

When I was very young I lived with my grandparents. Today that’s not such an uncommon thing, but in the sixties being a child of divorced parents who lived with her grandparents was unique to say the least. My grandmother was very sick and I often had to stay home from school to care for her. She was mostly bedridden and slept a lot, so the dog and I were on our own. All my friends were in school and I never cared for game shows or soap operas.

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There was no Netflix or digital books. Our house was filled with books, but more of them were for adults than a little girl. I had my own collection, but I’d read through them and often getting to a library to find other books wasn’t an option. Some days I really wasn’t in the mood to re-read, so I began to write. I wanted stories about adventure and space travel and horses, so I created them. Sometimes all in one story! That simple act allowed me to express myself and explore with my imagination. When I didn’t write, I went back and read my stories.

It was fun.

Eventually I learned what it was to be a published author and those were the people who created the books stored in our family room. I wanted to be one of those people. To me writing has never hard work, but something that seemed as natural as breathing. It’s my happy place after a day of dealing with the world.

So, to answer the question why I write? The answer is simple. I can’t not write.

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Lou Hoffman has a RaffleCopter Give Away be sure to check it out!