What is it about Dragons? Rather odd post by Lou Hoffmann

Lou Hoffmann Icon-logo-square
Yes, it’s me, Lou Hoffmann. I don’t have any kind of serious post planned, but I’ve just been wondering why we (humans from so many cultures) eternally like dragons so much.

No Really.

I mean for heaven’s sake, people, let’s think rationally about this. They’re reptiles. Scaly, cold-blooded. Certainly not cute and fuzzy. And they might be smart but they’re conniving as hell (like in Le Guin’s Earthsea cycle), right? earthsea-cover-le-guin And as destructive as an Armageddon (Like Smaug in Tolkien’s The Hobbit. And what about those dragons George R. R. Martin set loose?

Seriously, Puny humans hardly stand a chance against them, but there’s always a Saint George in every crowd, or else someone to befriend the beasts like Eragon with Saphira, or Merlin with The Great Dragon and later poor, sickly little Aithusa (who can still kick human butt).

I’m not being at all critical—I love dragons too. I just don’t know why. So you tell me: what is you love about dragons? And which is your favorite ever? And what about rainbow friendly YA books with dragons? Can you make some recommendations? I can think of Annabelle Jay’s The Sun Dragon Series and Sulayman X’s Tears of a Dragon—both available at Harmony Ink Press. There must be more?

May as well mention there are dragons in The Sun Child Chronicles. The brave and beautiful warrior/uncle extraordinaire, Han Shieth, has to fight them at times. But he’s also descended from them, which is not as gross as it sounds and is a story that will be told someday. Meanwhile, here he is in Wraith Queen’s Veil meeting a very distant ancestor, who doesn’t seem to fit the mold at all.

“What about you, Warrior? What do you want?”

Han sputtered in the violet pool, taken off guard. Before he could recover, the lizard-like creature crawled out of the pool and climbed down to him. As she passed through the colored pools, her scales shimmered through the hues, ever so briefly matching each precisely.

“What’s the matter, Wizard’s Shield? Never seen a dragon before?”

“Big ones,” Han said, and immediately felt stupid.

“Green? Gold? Oh yes, the red are in your bloodline. I remember, yes—that’s why I know your name. Well, Warrior, I think you should know that I am the mother of them all.”

“But you’re small.” Duh.

“I am always, only, ever, as big as I need to be.” She flipped her tail at Han—possibly on purpose—as she turned to ascend once again. “So let’s make a deal, eh?” Having reached the uppermost pool, she pivoted suddenly, fixing her impossible-to-ignore dragon eyes on Han, forked tongue hanging out lasciviously.

“Umm—”

“Speak when spoken to, young man.”

Sun Child new banner with CF logo

The Importance of Young Reviewers (also The Sun Child Chronicles News—cheap book, new book, giveaway)

Lou Hoffmann Icon-logo-squareHi! Lou Hoffmann here, apologizing. I missed my slated date for October by two days, but Charley doesn’t take the stage until 6 days from now, but I figure I can still slide in here with a few thoughts and some quick news.

First the “thoughts” (since I do have a couple today). Young readers writing reviews is a truly wonderful thing. I fairly recently became aware that sites exist on the web where students can share their reviews of what they’ve read, as well as connect with others and find out what others are reading and loving. A couple examples: Scholastic’s “Share What You’re Reading” section of their teacher resource, and Biblionasium—the latter with a great interface for young readers, inviting and easy to use. I know of only one sight, though, where authors can specifically ask for reviews from reviewers, and where the reviewers are encouraged to learn the art of the review—LitPick, it’s called, and their administrator, Tynea Lewis was recently named in ILA’s 30 under 30, recognizing her work there. Fellow YA author Michael J. Bowler told me about this site last year, and I quickly took advantage of what the site offers. You can post your book for review by any interested reader, or you can support the site’s work by purchasing a guaranteed or rapid review. (No, they don’t guarantee a good review, only that one of their student reviewers will indeed review it.) I have had The Sun Child Chronicles books reviewed by a student reviewer, and although the young reader, Nictaf, did indeed award five stars, the joy of reading evident in the words of the review is a far greater reward. That’s why I believe having young people review books is important—because it gets them reading, and reading is most fabulous. Nevertheless, I am proud of those five stars, and LitPick gave me a badge to show them off.

sun-child-2-covers-blurbs-lp-5str-banner
LitPick review of Key of Behliseth
LitPick review of Wraith Queen’s Veil

Now, about The Sun Child Chronicles…
In case you’ve missed it the ten million times I’ve already said it, Wraith Queen’s Veil releases this week, officially, on October 6th. I’ve got a blog tour going on, and I’ll post the schedule before I click out here today, but first some other news.

Today through Wednesday, Key of Behliseth is only 99 cents.

Yep. Book one for 99 cents today, book two release on Thursday. Pretty good set up, I hope you’ll agree. There will be other chances to save while the blog tour is going on, but, well… 99 cents, right?

Yes, I’m touring blogs. I hope to have some fun with the posts and maybe leak a few state (book-related) secrets along the way, and I also hope you’ll join me. Here’s the schedule. I reserve the right to switch up the blog topics, but this is how I think it will go for now. I’ll update with exact post links as they become available.

9/29
MM Good Book Reviews”: “Interview, Excerpt, and Giveaway”

10/5
Harmony Ink Press Microblog

10/6
C. Kennedy, Author blogspot: “The Beasts in Lucky’s Worlds: A loving look at the horrible, wonderful, treacherous, loyal, extraordinary non-humanoids in Lou Hoffmann’s The Sun Child Chronicles”

Divine Magazine: “Recommended Equipment: A Wizard, An Uncle, and a Faithful Horse”

Queer Sci-Fi—Sci Fi, Fantasy & Paranormal With a Bent Attitude: “Wraiths, Shifters, and a Ghost”

10/7
My Fiction Nook: “Familiar and Unfamiliar Places in Strange Worlds”

Prism Book Alliance: An author interview

10/10
The Novel Approach “An interview with Han Shieth and Henry George (a couple of badass characters)”

10/12
Drops of Ink: A different author interview.

10/15
C. Descoteaux Writes: “Why Bad Things Happen to Good Characters”

10/18
Emotion in Motion: “Character interview: Lucky and Rio (Yes, Virginia, there is a little romance in this fantasy)”

10/19
Rhys Ford: “How to Play the Game of Stars”

10/20
Rainbow Gold Reviews: “Blog Tour Finale: Why Magic? And Win a Signed Paperback Wraith Queen’s Veil!”

I also hope you’re feeling lucky (well at least luckier than Lucky, the series protagonist who has some tough times ahead) because a Rafflecopter giveaway is going on, with four pretty cool prizes.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

That’s it for my post this month on Authors Speak. Happy reading ’til we meet again!

Cover Reveal! Wraith Queen’s Veil by Lou Hoffman—Rafflecopter Giveaway

Book two of Lou Hoffmann’s The Sun Child Chronicles is (finally) coming October 6th! Check out this great cover for Wraith Queen’s Veil—art by Catt Ford! Lucky, the fifteen-year-old hero of book one, Key of Behliseth, has his life take a whole new turn when he moves from a fairly ordinary California town to a different world—his home world, Ethra, where the technology is all about magic, and transportation is on foot, on horseback, or by Portal of Naught. I hope you’ll join him on his adventures as his mistaken choices land him in the middle of an epic quest. Don’t forget the Rafflecopter! Scroll down for details!
~~~~~
Cover Wraith Queen's Veil by Lou Hoffmann (artist Catt Ford)

The Blurb:

When Lucky arrives in Ethra, the world of his birth and destiny, he expects a joyful reunion, but the first thing he notices when he reaches the Sisterhold—his home—is something false behind his mother’s smile. In a matter of weeks, the Sisterhold becomes agitated with worries and war plans. People he trusts—like the wizard Thurlock—frequently can’t be found. His mother seems angry, especially with Lucky. Even Han Shieth, the warrior uncle he has come to rely on and love above all others, maintains a sullen silence toward him.

When Lucky’s resentment builds to the breaking point, his bad decisions put him and his friends, L’Aria and Zhevi, in unthinkable danger. Han arrives to help, but he can’t claim invulnerability to the hazards and evils that threaten at every turn. Events launch Lucky, alone, on a quest for he knows not what, but every step brings him closer to his identity and full strength. Self-knowledge, trust, and strength lead to smarter choices, but even his best efforts might not render his world truly safe, now or for the future.

Preorder:

Lou’s Bio:

Lou Hoffmann Icon-logo-square Lou Hoffmann has carried on her love affair with books for decades, yet she hasn’t even made a dent in the list of books she’d love to read—at least partly because the list keeps growing. She reads factual things—books about physics and history and fractal chaos, but when she wants truth, she looks for it in quality fiction. She loves all sorts of wonderful things: music and silence, laughter and tears, youth and age, sunshine and storms, forests and fields, flora and fauna, rivers and seas. Even good movies and popcorn! Those things help her breathe, and everyone she knows helps her write. (Special mention goes to (1) George the Lady Cat and (2) readers.)

Proud to be a bisexual, biracial woman, Lou considers every person a treasure not to be taken for granted. In her life, she’s seen the world’s willingness to embrace differences change, change back, and change again in dozens of ways, but she has great hope for the world the youth of today will create. She writes for readers who find themselves anywhere on the spectrums of age and gender, aiming to create characters that live not only in their stories, but always in your imagination and your heart.

Find Lou on Facebook, or on Twitter, or email her at louhoffmannbooks@gmail.com. She loves to hear from readers!

Sun Child new banner with CF logo

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Alphabet Quirks, and meet Lou Hoffmann

Lou Hoffmann Icon-logo-square Here I am with my first Lou Hoffmann contribution to Authors Speak! Not to get too serious too soon, I thought I’d start with a few little bits of information about the English alphabet. Why? Just for fun! After that, I’ll tell you a bit about who I am and what I do, author-wise.

Alphabet Fact #1—Quirky

You know that funny looking thing called an ampersand? The one we sometimes call an “and sign” even though we know it’s officially an “ampersand?” Well it’s got a strange history, and at one time it was a letter in the alphabet. (Came after Z.) And it wasn’t called an ampersand. Not at all. It was, indeed, “and,” having started out as the latin word “et”, which means—you guessed it—“and.” In some fonts and articulations, you can clearly see the rounded E joined to the lower case t, sometimes upright, often slouching to one side. Baskerville italic ampersand 4880557608_d16c23e43e

So here’s the funny part. Think about, when you were a child in grade school and you learned to sing the ABCs. Did you think there was a letter called “elemeno”? I’m not about to confess, but I know for a fact quite a few school kids need to get that misconceptions sorted at a later date. The way “ampersand” became “ampersand,” is via the same route. I guess it was hard to sing “and and” at the end of the alphabet song, so the words were, “and per se and.” Eventually, so many kids had slaughtered the pronunciation that it all became one word. Makes you wonder if someday we’ll find the elemeno key on our laptops. (Wonder what that would look like….)

Alphabet Fact #2—Historical

Do you know where our letters come from? The most immediate ancestors of the characters in the English alphabet are Latin letters (as for ampersand), and futhark.

No, really, futhark. That’s a thing. A runic alphabet, to be more precise. When you hear people talking about casting the runes and so forth, usually they mean futhark. (In reality there are other and older runic alphabets, and most of the time they were used for very mundane things such as recording events, making signs, writing lists, and—oddly enough—poems about giants who were mean to women.) One of the most recently lost letters in the English alphabet is usually referred to as “thorn,” and if you think it was pronounced “th” you’re absolutely right. I have no idea why th took it’s place, although earl

Elder_futhark_rune_set_by_croppka
Elder_futhark_rune_set_by_croppka
y in its life, it did have a crossbar like t. Just in case you’re wondering, some people know pretty well how to write meaningful text in futhark, and if you have Microsoft Word, you have futhark in your symbols menu.

Tying these bits of alphabet trivia to introducing Lou Hoffmann, some of the character names in The Sun Child Chronicles series are derived from futhark runes. Prime examples: the wizard Thurlock (from thurisaz—another name for thorn—and kenaz), Isa (the rune is also called isa), and two of the young hero’s names, Perdhro and Mannatha, are indeed futhark runes as well.

Want to know a little about The Sun Child Chronicles? Click here to go to the Harmony Ink Catalog. And here’s a trailer for book one, Key of Behliseth.

Want to know a little about Lou Hoffmann? Here’s a brief bio:

Lou Hoffmann, a mother and grandmother now, has carried on her love affair with books for more than half a century, yet she hasn’t even made a dent in the list of books she’d love to read—at least partly because the list keeps growing. She reads factual things—books about physics and history and fractal chaos, but when she wants truth, she looks for it in quality fiction. She loves all sorts of wonderful things: music and silence, laughter and tears, youth and age, sunshine and storms, forests and fields, flora and fauna, rivers and seas. Even good movies and popcorn! Those things help her breathe, and everyone she knows helps her write. (Special mention goes to (1) George the Lady Cat and (2) readers.) Proud to be a bisexual, biracial woman, Lou considers every person a treasure not to be taken for granted. In her life, she’s seen the world’s willingness to embrace differences change, change back, and change again in dozens of ways, but she has great hope for the world the youth of today will create. She writes for readers who find themselves anywhere on the spectrums of age and gender, aiming to create characters that live not only in their stories, but always in your imagination and your heart.

Her blog: http://www.queerlyya.rainbow-gate.com

On Facebook as Lou Hoffmann, on Twitter: @Lou_Hoffmann. You can email her at louhoffmannbooks@gmail.com.

Thanks for reading! See you next month!

Sun Child new banner with CF logo